F. E. CLARK Inspirations

Here are a few of my favourite things - some are reblogged from tumblr (if you find something here of yours, that you would rather not be here - just let me know), others are treasures from elsewhere.
I try in all cases - not to reblog items with no source listed on them.
feclark:

Wish this one luck - off to its new home today :) Daily Painting - 20th June, 2013.  4” x 4”, acrylic on paper, by F. E. Clark.
Find me:  website, facebook, twitter

feclark:

Wish this one luck - off to its new home today :) Daily Painting - 20th June, 2013.  4” x 4”, acrylic on paper, by F. E. Clark.

Find me:  website, facebook, twitter

theparisreview:

Kay Ryan beside a cotton trailer, Pond, California, 1950. “My mother needed things to be simple and orderly. She needed to live a quiet life … Like my mother, I have a desire to live quietly. But then I have this other side that’s very garrulous, more like my father. I’m a patchwork of the two of them.”

theparisreview:

Kay Ryan beside a cotton trailer, Pond, California, 1950. “My mother needed things to be simple and orderly. She needed to live a quiet life … Like my mother, I have a desire to live quietly. But then I have this other side that’s very garrulous, more like my father. I’m a patchwork of the two of them.”

kateoplis:

"All of that…has helped me form what I call my 70 Percent Rule for decision-making. … If we just wrest our eyes, literally and figuratively, from our digital gizmos and the shitty, spoiling impatience they instill, we’ll see that this life, this planet, is amazing. That it is something just to be in the world, seeing and hearing and smelling. That for trillions of miles in every direction from earth, life really is blood-boilingly, eye-explodingly horrific. These situations where I can’t make a choice because I’m too busy trying to envision the perfect one—that false perfectionism traps you in this painful ambivalence: If I do this, then that other thing I could have done becomes attractive. But if I go and choose the other one, the same thing happens again. It’s part of our consumer culture. …So my rule is that if you have someone or something that gets 70 percent approval, you just do it. ‘Cause here’s what happens. The fact that other options go away immediately brings your choice to 80. Because the pain of deciding is over. And…when you get to 80 percent, you work. You apply your knowledge, and that gets you to 85 percent! And the thing itself, especially if it’s a human being, will always reveal itself—100 percent of the time!—to be more than you thought. And that will get you to 90 percent. After that, you’re stuck at 90, but who the fuck do you think you are, a god? You got to 90 percent? It’s incredible!”

"No, I’ve never been suicidal…But I’ve wanted to be.”

C.K.’s genius is all about how he forcefully accesses that psychic marrow of ours, ‘going there’ in an era in which it’s gotten all but impossible to shock. There is nothing he can’t and won’t demystify or de-sentimentalize. …Forget demystifying. This is an obliterating genius, an absurd, self-disgusted, generous, horny, inquisitive, belligerent, deep-felt, smart-stupid, bare-naked, vulgar, deeply ruminative, face-fuckingly frank genius. “

All Hail the King

Going to the library gives people the same kick as getting a raise does — a £1,359 ($ 2,282) raise, to be exact — according to a study commissioned by the U.K.’s Department for Culture, Media & Sport.

There we have it. Ray Bradbury knew that. Pair with this photographic love letter to libraries.  (via explore-blog)